Perspective corrected photos

You see in my photos, that I like to have my perspective distortion corrected. That is all the vertical straight lines in the photo are perfectly parallel to the horizon line. This is mostly from using the tilt-shift lens, that makes that easy, but also by keeping all other lenses perfectly leveled.

Funny thing about this is, that this is strange for the human mind. We normally see the perspective distortion and our minds expect it. So once it’s corrected it may feel odd.

And you maybe seen it in some of my photos. That it even looks like the top of the building is wider than the bottom. But I can assure you, it’s only an illusion. I check the lines in Photoshop all the time. But not that I can’t make a mistake though :)

Same for today’s photo, it may look a bit that the top of the building is getting wider, but it is not. The lines are perfectly parallel.

Bronze horses in Astana

I edit my photos quite a lot, but I usually don’t remove much from them. But there are of course exceptions. Today’s photo is one of those.

I really liked these horse statues in front of the Astana opera, but I did not like how they are installed there. There are standing on metal block, that were a bit rusted. And I just did not like that look in the photo. So I went in with Photoshop and removed them completely. Now the horses look more like they were floating, but it’s much better than before :)

This is a two shot blend, edited in Lightroom and Photoshop.

Bronze horses in Astana, Kazakhstan

Next top spots list?

The top photography spots lists are still, and probably will be for a long time, the most popular part of this blog. So I started working on the next list. And as you may guessed by all the recent photo from Astana, Kazakhstan, that what the list will be about. I plan to share it with you in the upcoming days, right after I finish it :) In the meantime, don’t forget to check out all the other lists.

Waterfall from the sky

This scene just looked so great in person. When they turned on the strong lights on top of the Expo 2017 sphere building, the lights illuminated the heavy rain that was in progress in that moment. And when the light hit the water, it looked exactly as a waterfall falling from the sky right onto the sphere. Too bad I did not manage to capture also a video, but it was really raining like crazy.

I even needed a wider lens, than the 16mm I used, but the 12mm I have is just not weather sealed at all. So I had no choice. Still, the scene was great, and I’m lucky that I even captured anything :) I should maybe animate this one in Plotagraph Pro. Could look great.

This is a single exposure, edited in Lightroom and Photoshop.

Waterfall from the sky, Astana, Kazakhstan

Favorite lens?

Which one is your favorite lens? For me it’s definitively the 17mm tilt shift lens. It’s just so perfect for architecture and cityscape shot. I get so much into a photo, that I would not get without it. And yes, I used it for today’s photo :)

Bayterek tower reflection

So is it Bayterek tower or Baiterek tower? I found both spellings on the internet, and even both in the same articles (on Wikipedia for instance). I would presume it’s Bayterek tower, as that looks more close to Russian spelling, but I don’t really know.

I was thinking of going also up to check out the view from insides, but did not get to it in the end. But I did get a lot of photos in the area around it. For this one, I found the biggest puddle that I could, to get a perfect reflection. And I got it :)

A moment after I got this photo, a little boy started riding through the puddle on his bicycle. And his timing was always perfect. When I was setup to take a long exposure, he would ride through the shot. When I changed my settings to a fast shot, to catch him in the photo, he would move away. And he did this repeatedly :) But I already had one clean photo, so I was satisfied with the result.

This is a three shot vertorama, each shot from 5 exposures. The Beyterek tower has just too many light on it, and they are all very bright. Blending them into a photo is really not easy.

Bayterek tower reflection, Astana, Kazakhstan

30 Different Types of Photographers

I randomly came across this video on YouTube called “30 Different Types of Photographers“. And there was one also for landscape photographers and the author got it quite right. If you want a bit of a laugh, go and check it out here :)

Night view of Astana

While in Astana, I also had the opportunity to go up to a roof of one of the skyscrapers in the city. And yes, I had problem with rain, but luckily it stopped right as I was on the way there.

One of the buiding I could see in full from up there was this long arch building, which I think (based on Google maps) is the House of Ministries. Feel free to correct me if I’m mistaken. It’s so huge that there are two roads going through it :). I could not even get it into one photo, even from so far away.

This is a two shot panorama, merged in Lightroom, finished in Photoshop.

Night view of Astana, Kazakhstan

And here are few details:

Night view of Astana, Kazakhstan

Panoramas in Lightroom

I often mention that I merged a panorama in Lightroom. And for those wanting to know how that is done, I made a tutorial some time ago. Check here to read it.

Flower reflection in the morning

This photo does not look like it, but in reality it’s a three shot vertorama. The reason for that is, that the puddle I used to get this reflectin, was very close to the flower installation. So I used the tilt shift lens to get three shots, that I then merged.

I found this light flower installation close to my hotel in Astana. I don’t know if it’s permanent, or why it’s there, but it just looked great. And one morning I walk to it before the sunrise and since it rained during the night, I had enough puddle to get the reflection I wanted.

This is a three shot panorama, merged in Lightroom, edieted in Photoshop.

Flower reflection in the morning, Astana, Kazakhstan
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