See where to go

See where to go

TOP PHOTOGRAPHY SPOTS

 Enhance your space

Enhance your space

SHOP PHOTO PRINTS

See how I edit

See how I edit

GUIDES, TIPS & MORE

Dubai

If you plan to visit Dubai, don’t forget to check out my Top Photography spots in Dubai list :)

Flying over the Dubai Marina

While I was in Dubai earlier this year, one of the things I did was to take a tandem flight over the Dubai Marina. It’s only around half an hour, but the the experience is wonderful. The new view you get is just spectacular.

So I took this photo while sitting in a second paramotor and being very high up. For me this was the first time I had an experience like this. For a moment I though it will be scary, to just go up in a thing like this. But luckily, I don’t fear heights and I could enjoy the flight fully. If you can and are not scared I would suggest trying it. When I go back to Dubai again, I will go again for sure :)

I have a lot of photo from this flight, and I don’t like them that much. I used the 16-35 lens, and I’m not sure what happened, but most photo are out of focus. will have to redo it.

This is a single photo, edited in Lightroom and Photoshop

Correcting missing parts in photos

You don’t see it in finished photos, but quite often, especially with panoramas, you may have missing parts in a photo. It’s mostly in the corners. When two photos are merged into a panorama, the software has to distort them to match them, and the result is not a rectangular shape. Here is an example of that in a photo from Hallstatt:

Correcting missing parts in photos

You can see that the corners are missing and also part of the sky and water as a result of the panorama merge. I could crop it all off, but then I would loose a lot from it, as seen here:

Correcting missing parts in photos

And that’s just not acceptable. So instead, I would crop it to the desired compositon I want, and then fix the missing parts afterwards. So let’s say I crop it like this:

Correcting missing parts in photos

And lets fix the problems.

Using content aware

Content aware tool is great for areas of single color or areas with smaller repeating details. So for a sky, wall, water, forest in the distance and similar, it creates some great results. It’s really not great for very detailed objects, where the details change.

Here it works best on the sky, water, and the mountain in the distance. Just choose any selection tool, select the are a little bigger than you need and then choose Edit/Fill (Shift + Backspace) and choose Content Aware from the drop-down selection and confirm.

You usually get god results, but sometime one need to select the transition area again and repeat.

Correcting missing parts in photos
Correcting missing parts in photos

Using clone stamp tool

The clone stamp tool is the best on repeating patterns. You can also use it on single color areas and similar, but that’s usually simpler to do with content aware. Again, it’s not really that great for detailed object like bushes for instance, where you will never match the objects exactly.

To use it, just choose the clone stamp tool from the toolbar on the left, hold down alt and click on the source location that you want to copy, and then paint in the missing ares. I personally prefer to do this on a separate layer, as that makes it easier to go back or blend only parts of the correction.

Be careful when using it not to create visible repetition (if there should not be one).

Correcting missing parts in photos
Correcting missing parts in photos

Warping parts of the image

If nothing works, you can try warping the image. By this I mean selecting a part of the photo, next to the missing area, and stretching it around to fill the missing spot.

You have to be careful not to stretch any straight lines or objects, as that is very noticeable. This works best on organic things, like bushes, water, clouds and similar.

What you do, is to create a rectangular selection around the area. You go a bit wider than you need. Than you choose Edit/Transform/Warp (or hit Ctrl+T, then right click on the selection and choose Warp). Now choose the corner or the middle point (base on where the selection is) and drag it outside the photo.

Correcting missing parts in photos
Correcting missing parts in photos

Don’t over do it. Once a hole start’s appearing between the selection and the rest of the image, it’s too much. In this case, undo what you did, and do it again but in parts. Drag the point a bit. Confirm. Create new selection and repeat. Piece by piece you will fill in the spot.

Correcting missing parts in photos
Correcting missing parts in photos

Once you are done, sometimes you get a very noticeable distortion inside. In that case, reselects it, go into warp, choose a spot inside and drag it towards the distortion. What you want to do, is to get the distortion over a bigger area, so it’s not so visible.

Correcting missing parts in photos

How this photo ended

And that’s it for this guide. Hope it’s understandable and if not, feel free to ask :) I wanted to show you this photo finished with all the edits, but I never did this one, I did one taken right after it, so I will share that one here :)

Hallstatt, Austria

How to not have people in your photos

As you can see from today’s photo, one of the way to avoid people, is to go out when it’s crazy hot and no one in their right mind would be outside :)

But there are also better options, and I write about those in the article here.

Sunny day in Salamanca

I would love to take this shot in the evening with the light on. Maybe next time I’m in Spain. But it will not be in Summer. Not again :)

This is a two shot panorama, merged in Lightroom, finished in Photoshop.

Sunny day in Salamanca, Spain

Looking back

There will be no new photos here today, but instead let’s have a look at my photography beginnings. These photos were taken right as I started with photography and some of them are even older than the first post on this blog.

Not that they are any good, they are over-processed like crazy, but it’s interesting to have a look at ones past and see how one’s work evolved.

Very old photos

These photos are all from 2010, taken with my first DSLR, the 450D. It was a great camera, but one really has to know at least something about photography to use it. I still remember the day I switched to manual focusing, how all my photos got better right away :)

One interesting fact here is, that almost all of these were taken handheld. Now I almost never take landscape photos anymore from hand. Tripod all the time.

Looking back
Looking back
Looking back
Looking back
Looking back
Looking back
Looking back

Portfolio page

For those new here, you can see all my photo in one huge gallery on my portfolio page. You can find it as always under www.hdrshooter.net :)

Neon lights on the bridge

Let’s continue with another photo from my huge Lightroom catalog. This one was taken one cold early spring in the town of Arnhem near Amsterdam. The neon light on the John Frost bridge are quite strong and make for a very colorful view.

This is a two shot HDR vertorama. It’s not really tall, as I did the vertorama only because a little bit of the bridge was not visible in the shot from where I was standing. So here I did two sets of 5 brackets, exported all from Lightroom, combined into blend planes in PTgui Pro. Then I merged them into HDR in Oloneo Photoengine and finished with blending the HDR with the original shots in Photoshop. Just few steps really :)

Neon lights on the bridge, John Frost, Arnehm, Netherlands
Page 1 of 5241234102030... Last »
FREE EBOOK!!!
Subscribe to my newsletter and get a free Capturing fireworks ebook. 
Subscribe